Friday, 25 May 2018

מביא ביד מוצצות

Hands cannot get lost during the night. She is self comforting. She won't suck her hands forever. She is only 11 weeks and needs to do this.

Relax and enjoy that she has found a way to keep herself content. Sucking on hands can be a cue of hunger. Why would you prefer she take a pacifier? At that age, a pacifier can fall out and they cry for you even at night to put it back in, baby can control her own hands. If she uses a paci for an extended period, it can be tough to break them of the habit - there's no reason not to suck it, your hands are always free and it doesn't keep you from regular activities.

It is a natural process and is healthy for her psychological development. She has much to grow still and will make changes throughout her many stages of development. Once a baby is used to a pacifier you need to have 4 or 5 on hand in case they get misplaced.

It is very hard to take them away from toddlers also. Some infants take to a pacifier and others refuse them. Why not let your baby enjoy her own way of soothing? My grand daughter sucked her thumb while holding her bottle to go to sleep. When she was older she held her sippy cup and sucked her thumb. Now she has no sippy cup and doesnt suck her thumb at all. Coming from a mom who's child was a pacifier sucking junkie, I would have much rathered her suck on her fist.

I guess a lot of motherhood is choosing our battles, but this is one battle I wouldn't handled much differently. It is a good thing that your little one has been turning away the pacifier; don't push it on her, but you can keep it handy if she wants to use occasionally. Some kids will try to keep them forever and then parents have to fight to take them away without doing emotional damage.

It can become a nightmare. As for sucking on her hands, its probably just something to keep her busy for now. More than likely, considering how young she is, she will stop it on her own in a few weeks. They always move on to something new when you least expect it. I wouldnt be too concerned about it. Keep her hands clean while she is doing this. If it does go on, you can put socks on her hands. Stores always have the hand booties for newborns so they don't scratch their faces with their finger nails.

I have never used them for my kids; it is a learning experience for them to touch anything they can - I never wanted to take that away. Good luck and remember, most things she does now will only be temporary and she will move on to something else soon. Enjoy every day and every new experience. I wouldn't worry about it. My boys didn't care for the pacifiers either. So, come to find out, my oldest got his first tooth at 3 months, and my second at 4 months and my third at 6 months.

So, let your child suck her hands, but she may be teething perhaps too, so I used homepathic Teething Tablets I got at Wal-Marts and now they have them at Hannaford too. The oly that bothered me was that she can get germs in her mouth from her hands, but don't get so worried or hooked up on it. That happens and all my boys survived. In my opinion you are lucky that she can self-sooth.

She will grow out of it in a few months, and you will feel lucky that you don't have to break her of the pacifier habit when she is a toddler. I know someone who is a speach therapist and when her daughter started sucking her thumb at 10 weeks she kept socks on her hands so that she could not suck her thumb. Infants go through an oral phase, where they put everything into the mouth. The reason is that the most sensitive body part of an infant are the lips. This is no big surprise, as infants can't yet deliberately move their limbs very well or touch things with their fingers.

Since she can't yet grab objects, the hands are the easiest "object" to use. I agree with the comment that the behavior is typical.

I have a 4 month old who eats her hand. I can see her rubbing her gums because her little teeth are starting to push through. If its not her hand its going to town on some toy I dont think the pacifier provides enough resistance so she's weening herself off of those.

Totally off topic, but, I read that offering your own fingers to them can help at this stage. Basically she just likes the way it feels on sore gums. From my own personal experience, I don't think you need to force the issue. Your child should eventually stop on her own, although when that happens will vary. I sucked my thumb as a child and didn't actually stop until I was about 9, but there was no outside influence or push.

I just plain stopped one day. My cousin did the same, although I'm pretty positive he stopped a lot sooner than I did.

Personally, I'd advice you to discourage this habit when it starts. It's normal for infants to put hands in their mouth, complete natural behaviour. But in long run, this can become a problem when you want them to grow out of this habit. With my daughter, I discouraged this by putting mittens on her hands and actively plucking her hands out if I find her doing it.

In some time she got used to this and resorted to breastfeeding for comfort which I didn't discourage. It is easier to wean breastfeeding when time comes than making them break this habit.

I've seen my friend's kids cling to this habit for soothing themselves in adolescence. Moreover, this habit is so persistent in preschoolers that they prefer their fingers over food. I remember my friend used to put her thumb in her mouth most of the time in school, and would not stop even when discoraged by teachers. She used to get teased by peers for doing it, still it didn't affect her behaviour.

This was when we were in fifth grade. I've witnessed such cases first hand and seen its consequences, so I advice you to discourage this habit before it starts. Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site the association bonus does not count.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead? Questions Tags Users Badges Unanswered. When should an infant stop sucking on her hands?

The baby did not like the feel of the sock in her mouth so she stopped. Now she has no sippy cup and doesnt suck her thumb at all. The sucking of hands ends rather soon too! Ross Apr 7 '11 at This worked for us.

I dont want her to get in habit of doing that. I would much rather like for her to take pacifier. Does anybody have any ideas how can i get her to take pacifier?

And how to make her stop sucking her hands? Thank you for all your help! The sucking of hands ends rather soon too!

My now two year old daughter did the same thing refused a pacifier , and the only time I catch her with her hand in her mouth is when she is teething and distracted watching a movie and zoning off My now 10 week old daughter does the same and I believe she'll be like my first with it ending soon. Be grateful she is sucking her hands. Hands cannot get lost during the night. She is self comforting.

She won't suck her hands forever. She is only 11 weeks and needs to do this. Relax and enjoy that she has found a way to keep herself content. Sucking on hands can be a cue of hunger. Why would you prefer she take a pacifier? At that age, a pacifier can fall out and they cry for you even at night to put it back in, baby can control her own hands. If she uses a paci for an extended period, it can be tough to break them of the habit - there's no reason not to suck it, your hands are always free and it doesn't keep you from regular activities.

It is a natural process and is healthy for her psychological development. She has much to grow still and will make changes throughout her many stages of development. Once a baby is used to a pacifier you need to have 4 or 5 on hand in case they get misplaced. It is very hard to take them away from toddlers also. Some infants take to a pacifier and others refuse them. Why not let your baby enjoy her own way of soothing?

My grand daughter sucked her thumb while holding her bottle to go to sleep. When she was older she held her sippy cup and sucked her thumb. Now she has no sippy cup and doesnt suck her thumb at all. Coming from a mom who's child was a pacifier sucking junkie, I would have much rathered her suck on her fist. I guess a lot of motherhood is choosing our battles, but this is one battle I wouldn't handled much differently.

It is a good thing that your little one has been turning away the pacifier; don't push it on her, but you can keep it handy if she wants to use occasionally.

Some kids will try to keep them forever and then parents have to fight to take them away without doing emotional damage. It can become a nightmare. As for sucking on her hands, its probably just something to keep her busy for now. More than likely, considering how young she is, she will stop it on her own in a few weeks. They always move on to something new when you least expect it. I wouldnt be too concerned about it. Keep her hands clean while she is doing this.

If it does go on, you can put socks on her hands. Stores always have the hand booties for newborns so they don't scratch their faces with their finger nails.

I have never used them for my kids; it is a learning experience for them to touch anything they can - I never wanted to take that away. Good luck and remember, most things she does now will only be temporary and she will move on to something else soon. Enjoy every day and every new experience.

My little girl about 3 months old and she already mouths quite frequently on her hands. Should we try to discourage this behavior now by pulling her hand away when we find her doing it , or wait till she is older? This is typical infant behavior. Keep in mind infants typically don't know what their hands are doing, that they can control them, or that they are even part of their own body.

My 5 month old son still wakes himself in the night, by whacking himself in the face -- he thinks someone else is doing it! I have to tightly wrap him in a blanket, to jeep his hands away. Be sure to keep her fingernails filed down, so she doesn't hurt herself. My first two kids hated pacifiers, but my 5 month old likes them.

See if she will peter a pacifier to her hand. Wen you're ready to stop the habit probably in about a year , simply rub the cut end of an artichoke stem on the offending hand.

The bad taste will stay on her hand and in her mouth for some time, doesn't stain, is a natural, and won't cause a rash or allergic reaction. Most kids try it only once or twice, before they get the clue that putting a hand in their mouth isn't a great experience. If the behavior persists, wait until she is old enough to learn to stop.

I'd let her do it at least until she can deliberately grab other objects to suck on instead. The only thing you should check is that the skin of the hands don't get irritated from being moist all the time, and keep the nails short though infant nails usually don't need to be clipped because they're so soft in the first place.

If moist hand skin becomes an issue, put some soft mittens on her hands and replace them regularly throughout the day. Infants go through an oral phase, where they put everything into the mouth. The reason is that the most sensitive body part of an infant are the lips. This is no big surprise, as infants can't yet deliberately move their limbs very well or touch things with their fingers.

Since she can't yet grab objects, the hands are the easiest "object" to use. I agree with the comment that the behavior is typical. I have a 4 month old who eats her hand. I can see her rubbing her gums because her little teeth are starting to push through. If its not her hand its going to town on some toy I dont think the pacifier provides enough resistance so she's weening herself off of those.

Totally off topic, but, I read that offering your own fingers to them can help at this stage. Basically she just likes the way it feels on sore gums. From my own personal experience, I don't think you need to force the issue. Your child should eventually stop on her own, although when that happens will vary.

I sucked my thumb as a child and didn't actually stop until I was about 9, but there was no outside influence or push. I just plain stopped one day. My cousin did the same, although I'm pretty positive he stopped a lot sooner than I did. Personally, I'd advice you to discourage this habit when it starts.